The Character Movement

THE YOUTH FRONTIERS BLOG
Educators building relational trust on an Honor Retreat

Community starts with building relational trust

Building community is one of the top three reasons why educators bring Youth Frontiers in to work with their students. In fact, 83 percent of educators reported that is why they partner with us.

Is it surprising in today’s divided world that educators need support in building respectful, civil communities? And not only do they need support in building community among their students, but more and more superintendents and district leaders need support in fostering trusting communities for their staffs.READ MORE

0
Students and staff building community on a kindness retreat

Big School, Small-Town Community

Haley Elementary is a big school. Serving more than 1,000 kids, it boasts one of the largest student bodies in the Chandler Unified School District. Though it’s grown greatly throughout its eleven years, the school prides itself on maintaining the culture of connectedness it pursued in its humble beginnings.

“Many of us teachers have kids or grandkids here. It’s just like a big family,” said Randi Bell, a fourth-grade teacher and grandmother of a fourth grader at Haley. “It’s really important to us to be mindful of each other — no matter how big our school gets, to keep that small-town feel.”READ MORE

0
Students talking in a small group on a Kindness Retreat

How the Kindness Retreat Changed My Son’s Life at School

Youth Frontiers recently partnered with Haley Elementary School in Arizona to facilitate a Kindness Retreat. One parent who volunteered as a small-group leader had this to say about her experience:

I went into the retreat thinking of all the things for work that I could be doing while instead I was volunteering at this event. But now I am so happy that I went.

As a parent, I naturally watched my own child at first, but soon I began to watch other kids too. One little boy in particular caught my eye. He was uninterested in the retreat, not smiling, not participating and definitely opposed to participating. As the day unfolded, I continued to watch him and how he transformed. It was almost like a burden had been lifted from him. He started smiling and participating. He even shared at the end of the day during the reflection time. I do not remember what he shared, but I remember the look on his face. It showed that he felt like he was a part of his class. It was so touching to see.READ MORE

0
Youth Frontiers' 2018 Staff

10 Things Youth Frontiers Has Taught Me about Community

Fall, for me, has always signaled change. When I was a kid, fall meant a new school year, which led to all sorts of other new’s: new school, new classes, new friends, new perspective — new. As an adult, I know life isn’t always contained within such concrete cycles. Even so, fall, upon its invigorating winds, still always manages to bring change.

This autumn at Youth Frontiers is no exception. As an organization, we’ve moved into our new headquarters, we’re innovating new programming, we’re welcoming new staff, while saying goodbye to some old friends — and all of that change has put my work life into perspective. For me, it has reinforced the importance of a positive, resilient community.READ MORE

0