advice Tag

The Boat Strategy

By Josh Johnson, Youth Frontiers Retreat Director and Youth Corps Manager

My wife and I are often considered the “progressive” or “cool” parents by our daughter’s friends. For example, we let our 15-year-old daughter, Reese, get a nose ring. It wasn’t a difficult choice to make, but to be honest, it wasn’t a choice I was completely thrilled with either. I knew the very moment that Reese displayed that little hole in her nose that the backlash would begin. I imagined walking through the high school during conferences, hearing another kid tell her parents, “Reese’s parents let her get a nose ring, can I get one?!” The parent would quickly declare “no” and shoot my wife and me a dirty look.READ MORE

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Acting with Wisdom

While I was out at a shopping mall recently, I saw a young mother tell her four-year-old, “You’re acting like a child.” I wanted to say, “Excuse me, your child is a child,” As a father, I can understand her perspective. Parenting would be so much easier if children acted less like children.
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Put Your Own Mask on First

A few years ago, I was on an airplane with my four-year-old daughter, Tess. She was in the seat next to me when it happened: the oxygen masks dropped down. Over the loudspeaker, the captain assured us we were safe, but that the plane had temporarily lost cabin pressure and that – for our safety – we were to put on oxygen masks. The pilot then reminded us to secure our own mask before assisting anyone else with his or her mask. READ MORE

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Marriage Advice from a Rookie

I am relatively new to marriage. Jane and I are approaching our 13th wedding anniversary. Many of my friends have been married for over 25 years and many of my mentors have been married for over 50 years. Thus, in some ways, I am a rookie. Today is Valentine’s Day — a day when it is nearly impossible not to reflect on your own love relationship. I am acutely aware that my marriage to Jane is Tess’ most significant model for love and relationship. READ MORE

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Tikkun Olam – Inspiring Our Kids to Repair the World

In the fall of 2008, I visited with a friend of mine whose son, Steven*, had just been cut from his high school basketball team. Steven was a competitive kid who attended a competitive school in an affluent, first-tier suburb of Minneapolis – and he loved basketball. Not only was Steven disappointed, but his pride was wounded. He wasn’t part of a school culture where failure was taken lightly. Furthermore, as a junior, Steven had a lot of high school ahead of him and legitimately wondered what to do with all the time he had set aside for basketball glory. READ MORE

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