Reflective parenting Tag

My Daughter, My Path to Reflection

By Joe Cavanaugh, Founder and CEO

Before my daughter Tess was born, I was always running from here to there, trying to accomplish as much as possible in what felt like as little time as possible. Sitting quietly, reflecting or meditating do not come naturally to me. Even when I would try to pause, far too often, the everyday pressures and daily grind would begin to creep in, swiftly ending my attempts to slow down and breathe.READ MORE

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keepers family

Love Is An Action

By Cheri Keepers, Youth Frontiers School Relations Representative

“When your child walks into a room, does your face light up?” – Toni Morrison

I have always loved this Toni Morrison quote. It reminds me of my favorite teachers and camp counselors who helped me be my best self by wholeheartedly liking me for exactly who I am. The simple way they remembered my name and connected with me through conversation and humor reminded me that I mattered.READ MORE

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Emotional Generosity Requires Radical Self-Care

This week’s blog post is shared with permission from Dr. Laura Markham and Aha! Parenting. Enjoy!

Most of us find that when we can stay connected to our internal fountain of well-being, it overflows onto our children and we’re more patient, loving, joyful parents. To love our children unconditionally, we need to keep our own pitchers full so we can keep pouring as needed. Quite simply, we can only give what we have inside. And even if parenting is the most meaningful part of your life, it still requires a whole lot of giving.READ MORE

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Parenting Together

By Joe Cavanaugh, Founder & CEO

Jane and I have been married for 15 years and have raised a child together for ten. While there are countless values we share, equally important are the ways we have handled areas where we differ. Navigating these disagreements has been an ongoing process and a constant parenting rub. READ MORE

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Erica's Babies

My Kids are Counting on You

By Erica Cantoni, Youth Frontiers’ Manager of Corporate and Major Gift Engagement

As near as this newbie mom can tell, parenthood is a Ph.D. course in understanding your children. Learning how to crack their codes and best nurture and teach them, and enjoying all their sweet, weird little idiosyncrasies. In the beginning, I took fierce pride in at least knowing my children better than anyone else does (save for my amazing husband). I grew these babies inside me, learned what time of day they would kick and worried when they stopped. Every single day of their lives, I have held them and studied their faces and learned which cry means hunger and which means I’m tired of being read to, lady, let’s do something else.READ MORE

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Tess

Take Time to Waste Time

By Joe Cavanuagh

One recent and particularly busy spring day, I came home late from work. I jumped out of my car – in my sport coat and dress pants – and rushed up the driveway. My daughter, Tess (pictured above), was waiting in the front yard. When she saw me, she called out, “Dad, come here and lie on the grass with me.” I haven’t done that in years. I looked at my ironed pants, put down my briefcase and walked over to lie on the grass with Tess.READ MORE

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Quiet Courage

This post was written by Sally Koering, Youth Frontiers Experiences Manager. Sally is married with three young children and lives in the Twin Cities area. Sally has been at Youth Frontiers for the past 13 years. Along with her work at YF, she also has her own consulting business doing creative consulting and presentation coaching. You can find her at sandyandallyproductions.com.READ MORE

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A Call to Retreat

Whenever I’m speaking to parents, corporate leaders or educators, the first thing I do is acknowledge how the audience (whether it’s three people or 300) has probably made some kind of extra effort to gather together. No doubt all of them rushed to work that morning, rushed through the meetings of the day or rushed through dinner to get to the event on time. So the first thing out of my mouth is, “Thanks for being here. No need to rush now. It’s okay for us to slow down this hour.”READ MORE

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