Respect Tag

Christy and her daughter on a hiking trip

How I talk about respect with my daughter

The following content is taken from an interview with Christy Lund, Youth Frontiers Donor Relations Manager — Minnesota. 

What do you think respect is?

I think respect has to do with demonstrating to somebody that they deserve to be treated with dignity, with honor, with care. It’s also a way that a person chooses to interact with something. We show respect to the environment or we don’t. We show respect to materials around us or we don’t.

So we can act in such a way that demonstrates those characteristics. And therefore we do something with respect or regard, or we do something without respect — and obviously degrees in between.

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I remember a student named Brooke

At Youth Frontiers, it’s our mission to positively impact school communities through our retreats. One of the more wonderful parts of our job is that the same students we reach often impact us in turn. For our staff, these students and their stories are unforgettable. In this series, we remember them.

 


This year, on The Character Movement, we are trying something new. We’ll be delving into one of our retreat values each month, examining it on our blog and in our Character Challenges. This month’s theme is respect.

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Family walking on a tree-lined path in fall.

Respecting my new intention

If you read the last post I wrote for the Youth Frontiers Character Movement, you would know that I have been using my bullet journal to keep track of both my tasks and my intentions for 2018.  Since January, I’ve accomplished much with this system. I read almost 20 books, caught up with at least one friend a week, and often did laundry when I needed to. However, after about nine months of using my bullet journal, I started to see that I was a little too good at this planning.  

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Teachers, Appreciate Yourselves

By Elena Aguilar

Teacher Appreciation Day used to be agonizing. I’d anticipate the day with all kinds of hopes and dreams. I’d imagine that students, their parents and my administrators would show appreciation in a way that matched the effort I’d invested. I was always disappointed.

Sure, there were usually some really meaningful cards from kids, and the annual bagel breakfast was nice. But I always felt let down because there was really no way that anyone else could truly see the energy I put into my work as a teacher — the only person who could see that was me.READ MORE

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Youth Frontiers Retreat Musician performs on a Respect Retreat

Aña’s Story

By Debra G, Youth Frontiers Retreat Musician

I first met Aña* at a Courage Retreat for Fridley Middle School’s eighth graders around 13 years ago. It was the school’s first Courage Retreat, and the space we held it in was dark and almost too small for the number of students who participated that day.

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How to Speak Up and Be Heard

Speaking up about what matters to you almost always requires a lot of courage. Unfortunately, speaking up does not always mean that you will be heard – it can be challenging and often times messy. It’s entirely possible that those who we hope hear us most are either unresponsive or uninterested in hearing what we have to say. It’s also possible that, despite our best intentions, our communication will miss the mark.READ MORE

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A Note on Perspective

By Joe Cavanaugh, Founder & CEO of Youth Frontiers

Recently, I came across the quote: “We need to not see more rightly, but rather more completely.” How does one do this in our polarized society? We tend to shout about how “right” we are – about political candidates, positions on gun control or bathroom access – and in the process drown out the opinions of those who disagree with us. However, seeing more completely involves listening and remaining open to perspectives differing from our own.READ MORE

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Parenting Together

By Joe Cavanaugh, Founder & CEO

Jane and I have been married for 15 years and have raised a child together for ten. While there are countless values we share, equally important are the ways we have handled areas where we differ. Navigating these disagreements has been an ongoing process and a constant parenting rub. READ MORE

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Our Children’s Friends

Often parents ask me what to do when they don’t approve of their children’s friends. As someone who’s worked with kids his entire life, I feel this one deep down. Whenever I’m at a school, I see with crystal clear vision the selfish, manipulative, petty and, at times, outright cruel exchanges that happen between kids. As an adult, it’s so easy to see which children are “good” and which ones are “bad influences.”READ MORE

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